THE UNHAPPY TRUTH ABOUT SODA and Obesity

It wasn’t so bad when soft drinks were the occasional treat. But now sugary drinks are the number one source of calories in the American diet.With one third of America overweight and another third obese, it’s a wonder anyone is still swallowing what the soda companies are selling
Beverage companies in the US spent roughly $3.2 billion marketing carbonated beverages in 2006, with nearly a half billion dollars of that marketing aimed directly at youth ages 2–17.  And each year, youth see hundreds of television ads for sugar-containing drinks. In 2010, for example, preschoolers viewed an average of 213 ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks, while children and teens watched an average of 277 and 406 ads, respectively.Yet the beverage industry aggressively rebuffs suggestions that its products and marketing tactics play any role in the obesity epidemic. Adding to the confusion, beverage industry-funded studies are four to eight times more likely to show a finding favorable to industry than independently-funded studies.  This fact sheet assembles key scientific evidence on the link between sugary drink consumption and obesity.

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The SODA FACTS 101

Research has proven a direct relationship between consumption of sugary drinks and an increase in obesity, which promotes diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and many other health problems.
Now you know the plight of The Real Bears. Real human families should also know about the risks of drinking too much soda. Here are the unhappy facts.

 

 Does it Makes sense for you?

Want to dive deeper into the facts? Download Soda Facts 101 with citations

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And an other cause of diseases ..Oxidative Stress/Free Radicals

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References

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5. US Department of Agriculture. Nutrient data for 14400, Carbonated beverage, cola, contains caffeine. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 24. 2012. Accessed June 21, 2012, http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/4337
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9. Coca-Cola: Don’t blame us for obesity epidemic! The New York Daily News  June 8, 2012.
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11. The Coca-Cola Company. History of Bottling. Accessed June 21, 2012, http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/ourcompany/historybottling.html
12. Jacobson M. Liquid Candy: How Soft Drinks are Harming Americans’ Health. Washignton, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest; 2005.
13. The Coca-Cola Company. 1.25 For 125! New 1.25 Liter Coca-Cola Package Rolls Out as Part of Brand’s 125th Anniversary Celebration 2011. Accessed June 25, 2012, http://www.thecoca-colacompany.com/dynamic/press_center/2011/05/125-for-125.html
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The statements made in this website have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diag­nose, cure, treat or prevent any disease.  The intent of the website is only to offer information of a general nature to help you in your quest for physical well-being. In the event you use any of the information in this website for yourself, which is your constitutional right, the Futurewelnes has no responsibility for your actions. If you use this information without your doctor’s approval, you are prescribing for yourself, which is your constitutional right.

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